Week of March 22, 2020: From Blindness to Sight (Ages 11-18)

Updated: Mar 25


Faith To Go Podcast: From Blindness to Sight w/ Kari Robinson

Hosted by the Faith To Go team in the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego, David Tremaine and Charlette Preslar, and joined the each week by a special guest, the Faith To Go Podcast highlights themes from the Sunday Gospel reading for you to take into your faith discussions and reflections throughout the week.


Reads: Love Alone Overcomes Fear

from Richard Rohr (Center for Action and Contemplation)


Questions:


1) How has your world changed in the last two weeks?

2) What have those changes been like emotionally, spiritually, and physically?

3) Who is suffering in the world today?

4) Why do you think it is important that we allow the suffering of others to "influence us in a real way?"

5) What affect might that have on the world? On us?


Views and Qs: Who is Invisible?

Watch this video together and then use the discussion questions below to reflect as a family.





Discussion Questions:


1) Did anything surprise you in this video?

2) What did you notice people needing the most?

3) What challenges of being homeless did the video highlight?

4) What do you think are some of the increased challenges in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic we are facing today?

5) How do you think we can continue to respond to the needs of the world while still being safe and responsible with our social distance?



Feast and Faith: Seeing What We Have Been Blind To

For this week’s dinner discussion, we are talking about Jesus' interaction with the Samaritan woman at the well from John's gospel.


Prayer -

O God of peace, who has taught us that in returning and rest we shall be saved, in quietness and confidence shall be our strength: By the might of your Spirit lift us, we pray you, to your presence, where we may be still and know that you are God; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.


(Book of Common Prayer, For Quiet Confidence, pg. 832)



Discussion –

In this fourth week of lent, as we enter further into this time of worldwide suffering, uncertainty, and isolation in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, let us follow in the footsteps of the man born blind from this weeks gospel story and notice things in ourselves and in the world that we might have been blind to before:


Questions:

1) Who do you think are the invisible people in our world today?

2) How has this current global crisis brought you to a greater awareness of these

people?

3) What other things have you noticed about the world in the last two weeks that you

never have before?

4) What have you noticed in yourself?

5) How are you responding to seeing anew these things that you may have been blind

to before?


Final Nugget: While this time in our human history is one of great fear and suffering, how is it also bringing us into deeper relationship with ourselves and all of humanity? Can you sense a deeper solidarity with yourself, your loved ones, and the people around the world that you never sensed before? What practices can you cultivate to continue to deepen that connection?



Stay and Pray: A Devotion for Families at the Close of the Day Each week we feature a way for your family to reflect and pray together. For families with older children this is an at home liturgy for your family to participate in together. It is a daily devotion for families adapted from The Book of Common Prayer.


Before you begin, take a few moments to decide who will read the scripture reading and who will read the collect and closing.


Read the Psalm and Lord's Prayer in unison.


After a moment of silence, begin with the Psalm.


Psalm 23

(read in unison)


1 The Lord is my shepherd; *

I shall not be in want.


2 He makes me lie down in green pastures *

and leads me beside still waters.


3 He revives my soul *

and guides me along right pathways for his Name's sake.


4 Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,

I shall fear no evil; *

for you are with me;

your rod and your staff, they comfort me.


5 You spread a table before me in the presence of those who trouble me; *

you have anointed my head with oil,

and my cup is running over.


6 Surely your goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life, *

and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever.


Gospel

(read by assigned person)


John 9:1-41

As Jesus walked along, he saw a man blind from birth. His disciples asked him, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?” Jesus answered, “Neither this man nor his parents sinned; he was born blind so that God’s works might be revealed in him. We must work the works of him who sent me while it is day; night is coming when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.” When he had said this, he spat on the ground and made mud with the saliva and spread the mud on the man’s eyes, saying to him, “Go, wash in the pool of Siloam” (which means Sent). Then he went and washed and came back able to see. The neighbors and those who had seen him before as a beggar began to ask, “Is this not the man who used to sit and beg?” Some were saying, “It is he.” Others were saying, “No, but it is someone like him.” He kept saying, “I am the man.” But they kept asking him, “Then how were your eyes opened?” He answered, “The man called Jesus made mud, spread it on my eyes, and said to me, ‘Go to Siloam and wash.’ Then I went and washed and received my sight.” They said to him, “Where is he?” He said, “I do not know.”


They brought to the Pharisees the man who had formerly been blind. Now it was a sabbath day when Jesus made the mud and opened his eyes. Then the Pharisees also began to ask him how he had received his sight. He said to them, “He put mud on my eyes. Then I washed, and now I see.” Some of the Pharisees said, “This man is not from God, for he does not observe the sabbath.” But others said, “How can a man who is a sinner perform such signs?” And they were divided. So they said again to the blind man, “What do you say about him? It was your eyes he opened.” He said, “He is a prophet.”


The Jews did not believe that he had been blind and had received his sight until they called the parents of the man who had received his sight and asked them, “Is this your son, who you say was born blind? How then does he now see?” His parents answered, “We know that this is our son, and that he was born blind; but we do not know how it is that now he sees, nor do we know who opened his eyes. Ask him; he is of age. He will speak for himself.” His parents said this because they were afraid of the Jews; for the Jews had already agreed that anyone who confessed Jesus to be the Messiah would be put out of the synagogue. Therefore his parents said, “He is of age; ask him.”


So for the second time they called the man who had been blind, and they said to him, “Give glory to God! We know that this man is a sinner.” He answered, “I do not know whether he is a sinner. One thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see.” They said to him, “What did he do to you? How did he open your eyes?” He answered them, “I have told you already, and you would not listen. Why do you want to hear it again? Do you also want to become his disciples?” Then they reviled him, saying, “You are his disciple, but we are disciples of Moses. We know that God has spoken to Moses, but as for this man, we do not know where he comes from.” The man answered, “Here is an astonishing thing! You do not know where he comes from, and yet he opened my eyes. We know that God does not listen to sinners, but he does listen to one who worships him and obeys his will. Never since the world began has it been heard that anyone opened the eyes of a person born blind. If this man were not from God, he could do nothing.” They answered him, “You were born entirely in sins, and are you trying to teach us?” And they drove him out.


Jesus heard that they had driven him out, and when he found him, he said, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?” He answered, “And who is he, sir? Tell me, so that I may believe in him.” Jesus said to him, “You have seen him, and the one speaking with you is he.” He said, “Lord, I believe.” And he worshiped him. Jesus said, “I came into this world for judgment so that those who do not see may see, and those who do see may become blind.” Some of the Pharisees near him heard this and said to him, “Surely we are not blind, are we?” Jesus said to them, “If you were blind, you would not have sin. But now that you say, ‘We see,’ your sin remains.”



Prayers for Ourselves and For Others (take this time to each offer one person/event that you would like to hold in prayer as well as one thing you are thankful for)


Dear God, tonight I ask your prayers for.......


and I give you thanks for ..........


Amen


The Lord’s Prayer

(read in unison)

Our Father, who art in heaven,

hallowed be thy Name,

thy kingdom come,

thy will be done,

on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our trespasses,

as we forgive those

who trespass against us.

And lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil.

For thine is the kingdom,

and the power, and the glory,

for ever and ever.

Amen


The Collect

(read by assigned person)

Gracious Father, whose blessed Son Jesus Christ came down from heaven to be the true bread which gives life to the world: Evermore give us this bread, that he may live in us, and we in him; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.



Share some of your conversations in the comments below:

#Ages1118 #Lent4

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